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Thursday, 12 June 2008
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McCain v Obama: What we do still matters

Poor woman
Drawmo

As I was walking to the train last week, a lady who had been waiting for the bus suddenly matched my steps downhill to the station. She was trolling a handcart and wanted to talk. She told me she was from Morocco, about her two daughters and a son, and that she was visiting her daughter in town. Her daughter had been married, but the husband ran off with another woman just as her grandchild was born. She wanted to know where I was from, and I said, “the U.S. � San Francisco.”

As we neared our destination, she turned the conversation to politics. She had a hard time saying what she wanted, but managed, “I know you have three candidates, two men and a woman. I like the woman. She doesn’t like war. I don’t like war.”

Whatever Senators Clinton and Obama are or aren’t, they certainly got the world’s attention. In truth, the candidates’ real position on the war in Iraq is not all that clear. But, that a poor woman living in Cannes would know that much about our political system suggests many things, among them that what happens in the US matters elsewhere.

She was a day late�Mrs. Clinton had formally thrown in the towel the previous evening. An excellent article in the New York Times spelled out some of the reasons: arrogance, internal infighting, and a failed strategy on gaining the number of delegates to win the nomination. By contrast, Senator Obama tapped into the “ABC” (‘Anyone But Clinton’) crowd, kept his campaign vague but timely, and proved he could count.

We don’t know who will win in November�that’s what campaigns are all about. More likely than not, the decision will rest with voters in the middle. Had Al Gore carried his home state of Tennessee in 2000, he would have won the election. And, while President Bush fooled us all in 2004, many of us went into the polling booths looking for a reason to vote for John Kerry. There weren’t many.

We didn’t think Obama would even run let alone win the nomination. And, McCain was given up for gone before his dramatic turnaround in the Iowa primary. The next five months should produce a good snapshot of what each candidate is about, who their key advisers and supporters are, and what we can expect for the next four years. One result is for sure, though: people will be listening. What we do still matters.





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Who we elect matters immensely in the Senate
written by Marty Duncan, June 17, 2008
Many would say we need a president who will use the 'bully-pulpit' to lead the Congress in the direction of fiscal responsibility and universal healthcare. We will not have that kind of president. Who we elect to the Senate matters. The Senate is the house that has the political clout to lead We the People in the right direction.
Professor, History, Rutgers University
written by naorman markowitz, June 18, 2008
this is a brief comment on the points. Al Gore won the election in 2000 and it was stolen from him. He couldn't carry his home state in 2000 because it was a "right to work" Southern State and an essential part, the new "solid south" which Richard Nixon began to develop and which Ronald Reagan successfully developed. There were many reasons to vote for John Kerry in 2004 because he was after all a liberal Democrat, regardless of his failures in the campaign in terms of image(politics are much more important than sports events.
We are today, as Franklin Roosevelt said in the 1930s, half a century behind the most advanced countries in terms of social welfare policy. The only way to catch up, and get out of the economic quagmire that we are in is to do it, to defeat the Republicans at all levels of government overwhelmingly and mobilize to push the democratics to enact legisliation that will establish a national public health care system, public day care, paid parental leave, a realistic minimum wage, a system of progressive taxation, and of course, and industrial and energy policies which subsidize those who create well paying skilled jobs in the U.S. and develop alternative and conservation oriented energy, not vice versa.
The Professor paints a pretty picture, but who's going to PAY for all this?
written by R Cabourne, June 30, 2008
Hold on to your wallets! All these increases will snuff out the micro business owners who are barely holding their own, but keeping others employed. Just WHERE is all this money going to come from to pay for all these wonderful programs?

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